Depending on where you live, you may not have even known that cable provider Cox Communications operated a wireless network, but it does: it launched last year (under the tagline "Unbelievably Fair") and offered a variety of dumbphones and Android-based smartphones in markets ranging from Orange County, California to Hampton Roads, Virginia. That'll change on March 30th of next year though, with the company announcing it's ceasing wireless operations due to a "lack of wireless scale necessary to compete in the marketplace, the acceleration of competitive 4G networks as well as the inability to access iconic wireless devices." We certainly believe it — event top-tier players Sprint and T-Mobile have struggled over the last few years to built out profitable networks and keep subscriber counts rising, so it's got to be doubly hard for a new player with a new network and a subscriber base of zero.

If you're using Cox for your wireless service, the company says that it'll be rolling out "special offers" to help move you to another provider over the course of the next few months, and they're promising a "seamless" experience along the way. The big open question, though, is what'll happen to Cox's cache of 700MHz licenses that it acquired as a part of the FCC's auction several years ago — the same auction in which Verizon and AT&T came away with LTE-capable national footprints.

Thanks, Henry H.!