Polynauts Central (16/10 Archived)

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Thanks to Lulzjager for todays fun header!

It's Tuesday, October 16th and I'm back, here at Polygon on The Verge.

After a nice, relaxing weekend in which absolutely very little happened in the way of drama (but lots happened in the way of fun) I returned to the south coast of England full of cheer, glad to be back with my girlfriend and guinea pigs - and you folks here at Polygon (& The Verge) too! Who were you expecting today, Salias? That guys rewiring plugs and eating steak, yo!

FROM POLYGON

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1: 'Project Eternity' surpasses 'Double Fine Adventure' to become Kickstarter's most-funded video game by Dave Tach

Double Fine Adventure concluded its Kickstarter campaign on March 13th with $3,336,371 in funding. Monday evening, with about one day left in its campaign, Project Eternity exceeded that threshold. At the time of writing the Kickstarter campaign has 23 hours to go and funding has already exceeded $3,337,310 with the number still climbing. The project has been backed by more than 65,246 people so far.

2: Cooperatives, Episode 2: 'Dishonored' by Chris Plante

The pilot episode of Cooperatives was successful enough that the video gods have granted us a regular show. Thanks for the comments and criticisms. We're still shaping the concept, so please continue to share your opinion.

This week, Frushtick and I take on Dishonored, 2012's best throat stabbing simulator. For an in-depth take on the game, be sure to check out our review. For a superficial and violent rampage, in which the blood of the innocents is spilt like a glass of grape juice on the family's best rug, watch the video below.

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3: 'Dance Central 3' review: like everyone's watching by Griffin McElroy

So much of the attention that's been paid to Dance Central 3 has been placed on its campaign, which exchanges the Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo-esque crew battles of past games for a whimsical tale of time travel. You, an agent of Dance Central Intelligence, are tasked with leaping through the past in search of dance crazes with which the nefarious Dr. Tan is committing "dance crimes" in the present. (Or something.)

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4: 'You' is a novel about playing and making video games by Dave Tach

You is also Grossman's attempt to explore the psychology behind the pastime its developers make. "[What] are people doing when they play games for hours and hours and hours out of their day? What are they feeling? What's driving the people who play and make games? It's a really human experience and I want to write about it in a way that felt satisfying and truthful," he said.

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5: 'Halo 4' developers explain pulling off distinctive design by Samit Sarkar

The suburb of Silverwater in Sydney, Australia, is home to a few things: a high-security prison that houses some of the state's most notorious criminals, a children's playground right next door, one of the country's very first Costco supermarkets, and a Krispy Kreme donut shop.

While often ignored by locals who aren't interested in bulk-buying glazed treats, something in Silverwater has caught the eye of some of the biggest game developers in the world.

FROM THE POLYNAUTS FORUMS:

1: The differences between a good game, a great game, and a "must play" game by ProjectNatalie

I know what I'm saying is extremely subjective to each individual. One person may love each of these games equally or in a different way than the next. I suppose, my dear audience, I want to know what it personally takes for a game to reach a certain "tier" in your mind. After the packaging has long hit the trash can, the dust has settled on the case, that "new toy" feeling wears away, and you've spent a healthy dose of time with these games.... what is it that separates a good, great, and must-play game?

2: Portable Gaming - A Future by GunFlame

When I was 20, I took a year out to travel. I went to Australia. I also brought along my SP. For the vast majority of the trip, I didn't even grab it out of my bag, but - if you've traveled, you may know this - when times went bad, it was more than happy to have lugged it around with me for the previous 7 months or so. There was one point where we were low on cash...very, very low. Work was really hard to find, and all in all, I wasn't having a good time. All of those cool pictures you see of people traveling are real, it can be awesome, but it's no escape from bad days. But, my SP was.

When moral was low, tired of eating crappy food and sick of sleeping in tents, I remembered my SP. I was able to escape. Golder Sun 2 and Final Fantasy Tactics Advance, those two games provided a salvation. They helped me. And from that point on, I have always wanted an option to play when and where I like. Portable gaming is something I appreciate greatly.

3: Atari 2600 by Amazing Spiderham

So I was just reading that the Atari 2600 was originally released in 1977 under the moniker Atari VCS and wasn't renamed the 2600 until 1982. So let me get this straight, the Atari 2600 sat around for five years before it became the cultural phenomena we know it as today? Is that true?

There are plenty more posts (too many to post at times) from the Polynauts community over the past few days - go check them out here!

FROM THE VERGE:

Ross Miller is live on the set of 'Old Habits Die Hard,' bringing you todays episode of '90 Seconds on The Verge'.

POLYNAUTS COMMENT OF THE DAY (15/10):

Yeah, we need FACIAL SHOTS people, so we can add your heads to stuff!

PaddyStardust (8 Recommends)

Every day there will only be one comment from the previous thread. It's decided based upon the most recommends an individual receives for their comment; should two people have the same rating then both comments will be posted.

Okay, there we have another days' worth of catch-ups folks. Remember to sound off in the comments below and share any awesome news you find today. As always check out the @Polygon feed on Twitter to keep up to date, or feel free to hit me up at @shaunmcilroy if you've any Polygon community feedback, questions or anything else you need an answer on.

NOTES:

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