After introducing a comprehensive redesign and expanding to include video and images, read it later service Pocket is moving into another new frontier: desktops. With its latest client, Pocket is bringing the visual and functional experience of its iOS and Android apps to the Mac, syncing saved content across all linked devices. Like it's mobile offerings, Pocket for Mac supports offline reading, sorting by content type (text, video, or image), and user-defined tags.

The Pocket for Mac interface consists of a two paned view, not unlike the expanded window mode in Reeder's Mac client. On the left, there's a chronological feed of all of your saved content, while the viewer falls to the right. For quick access to a particular item or category, users can search and filter articles by category using an array of controls in the left pane. Items can be read in their native format or in the classic stripped down, text-only and primary media view. By default, Pocket for Mac will automatically detect the type of content and determine the best view, though users can easily toggle between formats.

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While Pocket for Mac offers a simplified cross-platform reading and media viewing experience, it's not without its shortcomings. The app offers a fullscreen view for more enjoyable reading, but there's no way to hide the left pane of queued articles, which distracts from the "distraction free" allure of read it later services. Like the mobile variations, it also has a limited array of fonts and formatting controls.

A simple extension of the popular read it later service

Overall, Pocket for Mac is a simple extension of the popular read it later service. It provides all of the features fans have come to expect, enabling seamless content sharing and offline reading for your laptop or desktop. Pocket for Mac is available now for free in the Mac App Store.

Scott Lowe contributed to this report.