YouTube wants to be clear — its employees aren’t going to be the ones manually checking the false positives flagged by its automated Content ID video fingerprinting service. Yesterday, YouTube announced some changes to how it handles videos it believes were mistakenly identified for copyright violation, saying it will "place them in a queue to be manually reviewed;" a phrase that Wired points out has since been modified with an additional "by the content owner." The good news is that until the potential owner actually affirms the video in question is a violation, YouTube will keep serving it to viewers, hopefully putting an end to the kinds of accidental takedowns that saw First Lady Michelle Obama’s DNC speech pulled mere hours after it was uploaded.