As residents of the internet, we've all become accustomed to auto-correcting text fields and the algorithms that make the precognitive function work — but has our comfort blinded us from the censorship that accompanies such a convenient feature? The New York Times recently examined how the giants of Silicon Valley are using auto-complete to make our lives easier, while ensuring that certain terms, phrases, and ideas are kept from the eyes of the public, leaving a trail of collateral damage in its wake.

From a book title that was changed because it contained the scientific term for female genitalia, to the absence of the word "bisexual" from Google's auto-complete feature, algorithms and services that are built to keep us safe are also unintentionally keeping us from information that we are looking for. Head to the source for a few more examples of the double-edge sword in action and see what could be done to correct the auto-correcting problem.