Canon's A-series of PowerShot point-and-shoot cameras has long been the company's budget line, with a model for almost every (low) price point. It's no secret that this is an area of the market particularly under threat from the ever-increasing quality of smartphone cameras, but the company is attempting to stay competitive with a refresh of its lineup today. The highest-end models are the A4000 IS ($199.99, out February) and A3400 IS ($179.99, out March), which both feature 16-megapixel sensors, intelligent image stabilization and 3-inch LCD screens. The A4000 features an 8x optical zoom over the 3400's 5x lens, and the A3400 has a touchscreen in a first for the A-series.

The A2400 IS ($159.99) and A2300 ($149.99) both pair 16-megapixel sensors with 5x zoom lenses and 2.7-inch LCD screens. The A2400 features similar image stabilization technology to the A4000 and A3400, but the 2300 is otherwise identical. Both cameras will launch in March with black, silver and blue color options, with the 2400 also coming in pink and the 2300 getting a red version.

Finally, at the lower end of the scale we have the A1300 ($119.99) and A810 ($109.99), which both launch in April and feature 5x zoom lenses, 16-megapixel sensors and 2.7-inch LCD displays. They're seemingly identical, except for the A1300's left-field addition of a dinky optical viewfinder. The A810 represents a pretty significant upgrade for Canon's previous cheapest camera, the 10-megapixel, 3.3x zoom A800, which launched early last year for $89.99. While Canon's research and innovation is clearly directed towards the higher end of the market right now, it's notable that the company isn't simply racing to the bottom with its compacts.