LinkedIn has responded to concerns over an opt-in feature of its iOS and Android apps that transmits calendar data back to the social network's servers. Researchers from Skycure Security discovered that LinkedIn's iOS app collects information from the built-in calendar when a user chooses to view it within the app. Data such as meeting notes, appointment times, dial-in details, and the names of attendees is transmitted back to LinkedIn as part of the opt-in feature.

"We deeply care about our members trust," says LinkedIn spokesperson Joff Redfern, while admitting that the iOS app sends information about calendar events to the company's servers to match people's LinkedIn profiles. "That information is sent securely over SSL and we never share or store your calendar information." Although the feature is opt-in, it's not clear if LinkedIn users are aware how the feature works. LinkedIn says it doesn't store any calendar information on its servers, and nor does it share said data or access it unless users have opted in to the feature.

LinkedIn has now submitted a new version of its iOS app to Apple that will be available shortly with some changes to address some of the privacy concerns. Improvements, already live on the Android version, include a new "learn more" link with information on how calendar data is used and the disablement of data from the meeting notes section being sent to LinkedIn's servers.