LinkedIn has yet to receive any reports of unauthorized account access after 6.5 million user passwords were posted online by hackers, the company said in a blog post today. Although the perpetrators managed to crack and reveal a "small set" of hashed passwords, LinkedIn hasn't seen any evidence indicating that the email addresses tied to those credentials have also been shared.

"To the best of our knowledge, no email logins associated with the passwords have been published" says Director Vicente Silveira. He adds that the professional networking site is now working with law enforcement to investigate the breach, a process we imagine has only intensified thanks to similar attacks carried out on other popular web destinations in the days since.

Silveira reiterates that LinkedIn has contacted affected users but emphasizes that anyone with privacy concerns should update their password with a unique, strong replacement containing a mix of letters, numbers, and other characters. He pledges that further efforts to keep members secure are ongoing, and says his company will provide new details whenever possible as the investigation continues.

Should fate work in LinkedIn's favor going forward, it wouldn't be the first time a major corporation has dodged a bullet in this situation. Sony suffered one of the worst security intrusions in history when the PlayStation Network was hacked last year, yet there have been virtually no reports of credit card fraud or other consequences in the aftermath.