Problems with Google's Project Glass - How Will Microsoft Respond?

It's an interesting concept; information constantly available, but not in the way we are used to. Fingertips are less important than simply using your eyes. What a great idea! So, what's the problem? It can't be used without you being perceived as being rude.

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via graphics8.nytimes.com - Even on a good-looking girl, it still looks ridiculous.

Think of it like this; When you see someone that is constantly holding their cellphone, leaving it on the table and glancing at, you think they have somewhere else to be, someone else to talk to, something else to do. The same goes for bluetooth headsets if you're not in a car. People assume you are a self-important asshole because you can't be bothered with reality, as you have an important call coming in and can't be bothered with anything more than the total to be paid after you get your fast food (your time is valuable, you can't be sitting down at restaurants to worry about eating!).

Sadly, project glass not only makes you look like an ass, it also looks ridiculous. Wearable tech only works if you WANT to wear it; the first thing I would want to do after putting these on is take them off. They have already told me that they're too busy video chatting with their skydiving friends and checking 2 facebooks at once to bother talking to me.

Project-glass_medium

via wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net

It's not that it isn't useful. It's not that it wouldn't be neat sometimes. This is information presented in a way that screams "HEY! IGNORE WHAT'S GOING ON AROUND YOU! YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS RIGHT NOW!" Rarely is a cell phone vibrating or beeping not a sufficient notification that something needs your attention. Technology isn't what is holding back wearable tech. It's a problem with creating something attractive that people will actually WANT to wear. It has to look cool, not like you just got back from the Starship Enterprise. So how does microsoft respond?

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via kawaiikakkoiisugoi.com 3 words. Virtual. Boy. 2.

But no, seriously. Microsoft responds by not responding. It's not that they don't have the tech to make something like this happen. They know better than to put something like this out. Microsoft has started building a reputation of "cool," and there's no way they would spoil it by putting out a nerd-centric device like AR glasses. Of course there will always be laptops with glowing lights and aliens on them, but there has been a real effort among OEMs and from microsoft as well to create products that have a clean design that people actually want to be seen with.

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via cdn3.pcadvisor.co.uk - A simple design that doesn't scream for attention; rather, it invites it.

Ces-2012-lenovo-intros-ideapad-yoga-ultrabook-tablet-hybrid-2_medium

via i1-news.softpedia-static.com - Beauty and simplicity, all in one. A form factor that begs to be touched, but also works just fine as a laptop always has.

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via technomarket.org. A clean design that you feels good in your hand.

Microsoft is creating products with clean, quiet designs. They invite you to learn more about it, to touch the device and feel the texture of the materials. The OEM's are starting to understand this as well. Nokia is making some beautiful phones, ASUS stole the show at computex with a variety of clean designs, and the other OEMs brought some good-looking prototypes as well. I'm glad that Microsoft values their customers enough to create products that we would not be embarrassed to use.