The beginning of Anonymous' quest to hack the Syrian government began back in February, and last Thursday the group announced the results of its efforts: the transfer of over 2.4 million emails from 680 Syrian domains to WikiLeaks, including emails from the Ministries of Presidential Affairs, Foreign Affairs, Finance, Information, and Transport and Culture. The hacker collective said in a press release that it took up this cause to assist Syrians protesting the "evil Assad regime," which WikiLeaks claims is responsible for the deaths of between 6,000 and 15,000 citizens.

Despite several notable arrests by counter-hacker agencies, Anonymous' Syrian cyber-invasion wasn't inhibited — the group's website claims to have been waging an "information and psychological campaign" against Assad's government with Anons taking round-the-clock hacking shifts. What's more interesting, perhaps, is the mention of an Anonymous six-man squad that "...donned back-packs and walked almost 400 pounds worth of medical supplies over the border (along with ten pounds of chocolate candy for the children) and into Idib, Syria."

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange weighed in on the documents, saying: "[The] material is embarrassing to Syria, but it is also embarrassing to Syria's opponents. It helps us not merely to criticize one group or another, but to understand their interests, actions and thoughts." As forward-looking as that sounds, understanding these relationships will take take time. Over the next two months the site will be working with various news publications in an effort to expose tyranny within the Syrian regime.