Oracle has been ordered to pay Google $1,130,350 in legal costs following the broad failure of its long-running patent and copyright infringement lawsuit over Android. Google had originally asked for more than $4 million to cover the total costs of the quixotic suit, including significant fees for a third-party e-discovery service paid to surface and copy relevant documents. While the payment was cut back by Judge William Alsup, he was unequivocal in declaring Google the "prevailing party" in the case, and used the ruling to criticize Oracle's lawyers for "craft[ing] broad, and ultimately overreaching, claims of copyright infringement."

Judge Alsup also put an end to his controversial investigation into the use of paid bloggers, noting that the court "will take no further action regarding the subject of payments by the litigants to commentators and journalists and reassures both sides that no commentary has in any way influenced the Court’s orders and ruling herein." When the court originally asked the parties to disclose any payments, Oracle revealed a long-suspected relationship with the patent blogger Florian Mueller, while Google flatly denied any similar arrangements. Google later admitted to retaining Stanford professor and commentator Mark Lemley as outside counsel on "unrelated cases."