Google may be in hot water with the Canadian Competition Bureau. The bureau announced it would be investigating the company in May, but more recent reports suggest it's not too happy with what the investigation has turned up.

Documents filed to the Federal Court of Canada describe Google as controlling at least one market related to search and advertising, potentially raising anti-trust concerns. The documents also suggest Google may have engaged in a number of anti-competitive acts by manipulating search results to favor their own products, or preventing data export from the company's AdWords platform. If the acts are found to be anti-competitive, it would mean a violation of Canadian anti-trust laws, and potentially grave consequences for the search giant.

This isn't the first time Google has faced regulatory scrutiny over its ad and search practices. In January of 2013, the company reached a settlement over similar claims by the US's Federal Trade Commission, which resulted in minor shifts in company practices. Those shifts were enough to halt ongoing suits in the international trade commission, although competitors like Yelp called the settlement "a missed opportunity." Judging by today's news, it seems as if Canada may not be satisfied either.