The freshly announced Snapdragon 410 is, oddly enough, Qualcomm's first 64-bit mobile processor. More importantly than that, however, it's also the company's best-priced LTE chip to date, aiming to lower the cost of 4G-capable devices to below the $150 mark. There's a clear focus on China and other emerging markets with the 410, which Qualcomm hopes to see driving LTE adoption outside the maturing North American and western European spheres. Just like the Snapdragon 400 before it, the 410 supports 1080p video playback and up to 13-megapixel cameras, while the GPU is mildly upgraded from the Adreno 305 to the 306.

The Moto G has already shown the incumbent processor to be plenty powerful, so seeing it renewed with LTE on board will be exciting to frugal smartphone buyers everywhere.

Sampling out to manufacturers early in 2014 and on retail shelves by the second half of the year, the Snapdragon 410 looks like the first step en route to a full family refresh for Qualcomm's mobile chips. The top-end Snapdragon 800 has been the SOC of choice for flagship phones this year — whether you're talking Nexus 5, Xperia Z1, or LG's G2 — and its successor can reasonably be expected to follow in the 410's footsteps in moving to 64-bit while sprucing up performance. Qualcomm describes the shift to 64-bit as supporting "the transition to the next generation of mobile operating systems," and we should be seeing much more of it at CES 2014 next month.