What happened to LG?

20130110-625a1525verge

LG entered the smartphone market with its 'Optimus' brand in 2010 and launched a series of smartphones since but has failed to garner consumers' attention. Today, it is still clinging on to the mobile business and will soon premiere the Korean variant of the Optimus G Pro we saw earlier in Japan.

The predecessor Optimus G was unveiled merely five months ago but it hasn't performed as well as the company had hoped. The hype prior to the launch event in Seoul was being blown up by the local media; many called it the "LG Chairman phone" but the company's own teaser website gave away the specifications as well as the design of the device before the event.

Shortly after, LG began to air TV commercials for the Optimus G.

The AT&T and Sprint models were reviewed by Dieter Bohn, one of our Senior Editors at The Verge. Here's what he had to say about the device:

The Optimus G is the first time in recent memory that LG has managed to legitimately get a flagship Android smartphone on US carriers. Part of the reason for that is that the Optimus G hits all the right notes: a fast quad-core processor, LTE, excellent screen, and above-average build quality. LG has finally managed to put all those pieces together into an excellent hardware package with a modicum of design flair.

He goes on to say:

Unfortunately, as of this writing Sprint has yet to announce a price or a release date for the Optimus G. The absence is another sign that LG doesn't have the same marketing muscle as the company it so often emulates: Samsung. Taken as a whole, the Optimus G doesn't quite match the overall consistency that Samsung or HTC have brought to the table. That's primarily due to some software foibles that would be forgivable on a lesser phone, but feel out of place in the upper echelons. If you're experienced enough with Android to work around the software hassles, you'll find the Optimus G to be a fast and fluid smartphone.

LG simply does not match the strong leadership of Samsung's nor does it come any closer to Samsung's capability to launch and ship millions of devices worldwide. However, LG can make a decent phone if they wanted to and the Nexus 4 helped the company to get some recognition it desperately needed. Hopefully LG can turn it around at least in Korea with the Optimus G Pro supported by Ads focusing on the product.

Can LG turn it around? How?