After successfully carving out a huge chunk of the smartphone market for itself, Samsung is returning to its feature phone roots with a new line of budget phones called Rex. There are four Rex handsets in total; three (the Rex 70, 80, and 90) have capacitive touchscreens, while the cheapest model, the Rex 60, has a resistive display. They're all running a Java-based OS with Samsung's familiar TouchWiz UI on top, and have features tailored for emerging markets such as the Opera Mini browser, which has a compression system to save on data fees, and dual SIM options with hot-swapping.

It's clear that Samsung is gunning for Nokia's position as king of the low-end with Rex. Although the Finnish manufacturer is betting big on its Lumia Windows Phones, Nokia remains one of the largest phone manufacturers in the world (by volume) thanks almost entirely to its featurephone lineup. Its Asha line, which bridges its ultra-low-end models and its cheapest Windows Phones, outsold Lumias almost two-to-one last quarter. Nokia has a lot of experience in delivering a decent experience on a budget, and its name still carries clout in developing nations — Samsung will face challenges if it truly wants to muscle in on this particular market.