Politicians in Iceland are mulling a law that would block online porn within the country, The Daily Mail reports. In an interview with the Mail, Interior Minister Ögmundur Jónasson says he's set up working parties to help determine the best way to go about the problem; options include making it illegal to pay for pornography with an Icelandic credit card or setting up a filter to block offending IP addresses. The law already forbids publishing or distributing pornography in Iceland, but expanding it to cover the internet would raise a host of new problems, including greater questions of censorship and a more pressing need to determine what is and isn't pornographic — something that's been debated to a lesser extent in past years.

Jónasson's advisor Halla Gunnarsdóttir said that the move was necessary because "young children are seeing porn and acting it out," and both she and Jónasson refer to "violent pornography," though the law would apparently aim to block all online pornographic material for all ages. Iceland has previously implemented such laws as a 2010 ban on strip clubs, often as part of a platform that pushes gender equality and an end to the exploitation of women. "If we can send a man to the moon," says Gunnarsdóttir, "we must be able to tackle porn on the internet."

"The possibility that this bill will pass through the parliament is near zero."

This proposed law, however, may end up being little more than wishful thinking. Though Gunnarsdóttir says she hopes the bill will pass, member of parliament Birgitta Jónsdóttir — previously known for her work with WikiLeaks — says its actual chance of it going through successfully is "thankfully... near zero." Instead, she says her committee is "looking into alternative ways to help parents to protect their children from online porn, mainly through free porn-filter software and educational means."