Welcome to The Verge: Weekender edition. Each week, we'll bring you important articles from the previous weeks' original reports, features and reviews on The Verge. Think of it as a collection of a few of our favorite pieces from the week gone by, which you may have missed, or which you might want to read again.

Basis B1 fitness band review: taking tracking far beyond calories and steps

Data is your friend if you're trying to get in shape, and the Basis B1 fitness band gives you a whole lot of it. This wristband measures your heartbeat, temperature, perspiration level, and other vital signs to help you get in shape. But knowing's only half the battle, and the other half is actually using it to get in shape. We strapped on the B1 and started working out, to see how sexy and svelte data could make us.


Asus Taichi review (11.6-inch)

Most Windows 8 machines tend to look alike, but Asus's Taichi is pretty hard to mistake. It's an 11.6-inch laptop with not one, but two screens, one designed for laptop use and the other for when you want a tablet. It's a weird, crazy, bizarre idea, and we used the Taichi for a while to see if it works.

Fighting dirty: Microsoft’s mean ‘Scroogled’ ads are a sign of what's to come

Microsoft's new "Scroogled" ad campaign is a direct shot at Google and its advertising practices that looks more like a political campaign than a gadget PR blast. Adrianne Jeffries tells us why the future of tech advertising is going to be more negative and why that might not be a terrible thing.

The joy, wonder, and weirdness of Toy Fair 2013

This is what over 300,000 square feet of fun looks like.


Photoshop is a city for everyone: how Adobe endlessly rebuilds its classic app

Like New York or London, the image-editing app is layered thick with the past.

Mainlining TV: 'House of Cards' and the joys of addiction viewing

Trent Wolbe spends a weekend watching the entire, new Netflix series.


You're not gonna Like it: Facebook's new search struggles with the real world

Facebook's new Graph Search is fun and clever the first time you use it, but can it really hold up over time and become the "third pillar" Mark Zuckerberg wants it to be? Ellis Hamburger explores the challenges of searching a social network that has less information about what you like than you may think.