The International Herald Tribune, a staple of newsstands around the world that just celebrated its 125th anniversary, is being renamed as part of The New York Times Company's continued efforts to adjust its businesses. The paper will be rebranded as the International New York Times, and the transition is expected to be completed by the end of the year. The company has offered few details on how the rebrand will substantively change the paper, but it does say in a press release that a new website will be released and that the paper's masthead will be changed.

126-year-old paper undergoes its latest name change

The company calls the new paper an "international version of The New York Times that will be tailored and edited specifically for global audiences," suggesting the relaunched paper will contain more content from the company's core property. Since the The New York Times took part ownership of the International Herald Tribune in 1967, it's worked to integrate the two papers. In 2003 it took full ownership, and in 2009 a relaunched website marked the International Herald Tribune as "The Global Edition of The New York Times."

CEO of The New York Times Company, Mark Thompson, provided some details on the impetus behind the change in a statement: "The digital revolution has turned The New York Times from being a great American newspaper to becoming one of the world’s best-known news providers." It's clear that the company is refocusing on its core brand, and that it's working to keep its papers relevant both online and in print. Earlier this month the company restarted efforts to sell The Boston Globe and the rest of its New England Media Group. Last year, it sold off About.com for $300 million to IAC.