Design studio Chaotic Moon is known for its work on the "Board of Awesomeness" and "Board of Imagination," which push the humble skateboard into new territory with electric power and thought control. Its followup takes on a somewhat different problem: giving skaters and bicyclists an antidote to their vulnerable position on the road. The "Helmet of Justice," demoed on CNN last week, was developed in response to a hit-and-run that left Chaotic Moon employee John Poindexter injured with no idea what had happened. Its core feature is a network of seven cameras that provide a 360-degree view around the wearer's head. When the helmet detects impact via an accelerometer, it starts recording, theoretically capturing the accident — whether it's a simple fall or something more sinister.

The helmet can capture up to two hours of video after impact, and the resulting files can be recovered over USB, mimicking the operation of car "black boxes." Besides simple safety features, though, Chaotic Moon sees a potential future in the increasingly popular wearable electronics and life-logging market. Later versions of the helmet could log ride data, recognize objects, or offer stitched-together panoramic images. For now, the company is exploring licensing the current version to sporting goods companies, where it would be expected to sell for around $300.