There's a huge amount of public data available on Twitter, and a new data-visualization tool really hammers that home — developer Santiago Ortiz has mapped out the relationships between every Twitter employee based on their tweets to each other. Ortiz used Twitter's API to pull all the tweets authored by Twitter employees for a one-week period, and then filtered those tweets by only those made between employees. The visualization Ortiz created is almost overwhelming in its depth of detail: hovering over a user's avatar shows all the tweet-connections made by that person during the week, and clicking the avatar zooms in on that person and his or her contacts. Even more dramatically, you can click a "play" button to see a fast-forwarded view of every connection as it happened throughout the entire week — you can see small one-on-one coversations quickly branch to include more and more people. You can even click one user and drag to another to see a stream of any conversations the two individuals had.

While it feels slighly invasive and creepy, the simple fact is that none of these tweets are private — Ortiz only collected and collated this information into a more digestible form. As he told Fast Company Design, Ortiz took this challenge on simply to see if he could map a corporate hierarchy just using tweets, and figured that analyzing Twitter itself would be a good starting place. "The question is if this network matches the company structure...I believe yes, at least to some extent," Ortiz said. Even after spending just a minute with Ortiz' visualization, one thing is immediately obvious — Twitter employees certainly do like to use Twitter.