Welcome to The Verge: Weekender edition. Each week, we'll bring you important articles from the previous weeks' original reports, features and reviews on The Verge. Think of it as a collection of a few of our favorite pieces from the week gone by, which you may have missed, or which you might want to read again.

  • Review

    HTC One review

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    There should be little disagreement that the HTC One is the best looking Android smartphone around right now. But the company has made some interesting choices when it comes to software: the phone’s homescreen has been replaced with a continually updating Flipboard-like news feed. The big question though is if HTC’s bets will pay off in its coming battle against Samsung and the Galaxy S4.

  • Report

    Inside the New York Times' web redesign

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    Having announced its first major web redesign since 2006, Tim Carmody heads across town to the offices of the New York Times to sit down with the people behind it.

  • Report

    Google shuffle: can Android and Chrome OS combine to take on Microsoft?

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    Android co-creator Andy Rubin's sudden shuffle away from the Android team could signal a major shift in Google's strategy. Could a combined Android-Chrome OS juggernaut be in our future?

  • Feature

    NASA rockets into social space, but lacks a clear mission

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    Thanks in no small part to the landing of the Curiosity rover, NASA's social media presence has become one of the most popular and entertaining on the internet (among government agencies, anyway). But is it going the direction that a successful space program needs to go? Adrianne Jeffries reports from SXSW.

  • Report

    'Ridiculous Fishing' turns slaughtering sea life into one of the iPad's best games

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    Thanks to a fast-selling clone, one of the most popular iOS games of the year — Ridiculous Fishing — almost didn't happen. Andrew Webster talks to the title's creators.

  • Review

    Roku 3 review

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    Is having all of our content in one easy-to-use place too much to ask? With 750 “channels” — from Netflix and Pandora to rental services like Vudu — Roku might just have everything that we're looking for.