Gaming hardware modder Bacteria has created the ultimate retro console mod, combining 15 systems into one machine that can be operated with a single controller. The system houses a host of older consoles including the Atari 7800, as well as multiple Sega and Nintendo generations including the Dreamcast and Gamecube. With emulation and backward compatibility built into some of the systems, the project is capable of playing a total of 18 console's games. Bacteria has aptly titled the bundled console Project Unity.

The project's final hardware is housed in a large wooden box with a label above each of the fifteen disc drives and cartridge slots to indicate which console's media a given drive accepts. The full machine weighs 44 pounds, took three years to make, and cost just over $1,000 in parts (although it's unclear if this includes the cost of the consoles as well). To make a controller work with all 15 systems, Bacteria included 16 buttons, three joysticks, and a D-pad. Though it may be some time before you can purchase a combined console as extensive as Project Unity, accessory maker Hyperkin unveiled a similar, but less ambitious system last month that can accept almost any retro game cartridge that you may want to play.