Boeing's 787 Dreamliner will soon return to the air with passengers onboard — the Federal Aviation Administration just announced that it has lifted the airplane's flight ban following the approval of its redesigned battery system, reports Reuters. The lifting of the restriction at this point isn't a big surprise, as the FAA approved the fixes Boeing made to the 787's battery system last week, but now the plane is all clear to get back into the air. This comes after more than three months of drama for Boeing's jet — back in January, a pair of battery-related fires prompted the FAA to investigate and eventually ground the 787 until Boeing could fix the plane's issues.

Before the planes can return to the sky, however, Boeing needs to retrofit the fleet of about 50 planes with the new battery system, a task that the company said should be complete by mid-May. All told, the FAA estimates that repairs to United Airlines' six 787s will cost the company about $2.8 million — so fixing the whole fleet will be quite the expensive undertaking.