Along with .book, .author, and .read, Amazon is trying to lay claim to the .amazon top-level domain, and not surprisingly, it’s facing some opposition. The governments of Brazil and Peru think that the honor should go to the actual Amazon River, or rather, the protection of its environment, the advancement of indigenous rights, and other uses in the public interest. The Guardian reports that the two governments have lodged complaints with ICANN, the international body responsible for the internet’s naming system. Brazil’s Ministry of Science and Technology sums up the countries’ opposition, saying that "allowing private companies to register geographic names as gTLDs to reinforce their brand strategy or to profit from the meaning of these names does not serve, in our view, the public interest," and adding that other countries in the region share its opinion.

A similar case is unfolding in Argentina, where the government is competing with outdoor clothing retailer Patagonia for the .patagonia top-level domain. Proper nouns aren’t the only TLDs being disputed, though. Amazon is currently battling it out with publishing industry groups over its application for the .book domain.