In a reverse of course, Google just announced that it will be keeping its CalDAV API open to all developers. Additionally, the company is today making CardDAV — its preferred tool for syncing contact information — available to the public for the first time. Google initially intended to alter CalDAV so the API would adhere to "partner-only" access, allowing only predetermined app makers to utilize the underlying technology behind its calendar syncing. But an abundance of developer feedback apparently gave Google "a better understanding of developers’ use cases" and led to the company revisiting its ill-received decision.

Continued access to both APIs are particularly important for Windows users, after Google announced it would be phasing out support for Exchange ActiveSync last year. Consumers who've already set up Exchange accounts through Gmail remain covered, but syncing with Microsoft's platform is no longer an option for new users. Microsoft has since resolved to implement support for CalDAV and CardDAV in Windows Phone 8.

Google's change of heart could help to offset rising criticism of the company's commitment to "openness," which has recently been called into question — particularly after Google Hangouts ditched support for the open XMPP standard.