Twitter has handed over data to French authorities disclosing the details of users accused of posting racist and anti-Semitic tweets. After months of legal appeals requesting that the company share user data with France's Union of Jewish Students (UEJF) and four other human rights organizations, Twitter has acquiesced, bringing an end to the dispute between the two parties that started in November 2012.

In a statement sent to The Verge, Twitter says it will work with the UEJF "to actively continue contributing together to the fight against racism and anti-Semitism," adding that it will take measures to "improve the accessibility of the reporting procedure of illegal Tweets." The UEJF took further legal action against Twitter in March over claims it had not complied with court orders to hand over user data, while Twitter saw its appeal rejected by a Paris appeals court in June.

In the past, Twitter has worked with foreign governments to comply with local laws, and has removed some of the anti-Semitic tweets at issue. The company previously bashed the UEJF for its approach over the complaint, accusing it of "grandstanding" rather than "taking the proper international legal path" to obtain the data. With an agreement worked out, Twitter will escape further legal pressure in France and the UEJF has said it will hand over any damages it has been awarded to charity.