Genetic data can reveal risks of cancer and other illnesses, so why can't it also tell if someone is prone to violent behavior? The Pittsburgh Post Gazette reports on the efforts of Jeremy Richman and Jennifer Hensel in starting The Avielle Foundation, which hopes to determine just that. The couple began the organization in remembrance of their daughter Avielle, who died in the Sandy Hook shooting — and they intend to fund research into biological triggers that could predict violent outbreaks before they happen. But some are skeptical of the research: though Richman and Hensel view it as a way to help people with aggressive behavior, no one's certain of what would become of a person found to carry a dangerous trait for violence.