After the Yahoo purchase and more recent concerns that Tumblr was changing its policies regarding porn on the service, CEO David Karp has post some more information to "clear up (and fix) a few things." Admitting that "most of the confusion seems to stem from our complicated flagging/filtering features," Karp goes on to detail three areas where Tumblr is working to simplify some features and turn on some bug fixes. First, apparently there was a bug that prevented NSFW content from appearing in Tumblr search results even if a user had disabled "Safe Mode." Karp says this bug has been fixed.

"Different app environments have different requirements."

Second, Karp says that some tags were being blocked in some apps, mainly because "they are still frequently returning adult content" even though the tag itself is theoretically something innocuous, like "#gay." Karp implies the restrictions are necessary to keep Tumblr's apps from being blocked by app stores. Eventually the company hopes to enable smarter filtering and, in the meantime, Tumbr is curating the "#lgbtq" tag to ensure it's safe for work.

Finally, and most related to the worries that arose earlier this week, Karp admits that Tumblr is de-listing some sites from third-party search engines. Karp characterized them as a "tiny subset of blogs" that were primarily spammy porn sites. Users can now check a new, clearer option called "Flag this blog as NSFW" which will keep it from being seen by Safe Mode users but not de-list it from third party search engines.

Tumblr is still keeping to the line that it wants to "[empower] your creative expression" and says that none of its policies regarding porn have changed — setting apart the above bug fixes. However, the company is learning that running a service that can find a balance between helping users who want porn and those who don't is much easier said than done.