There's no such thing as a free download. Jay-Z announced he was leaking his new album, Magna Carta Holy Grail, five days early via an app, which seemed like a generous and innovative move. However, he didn't note that fans would be forced to give him access to their location and phone status. The permissions request was enough to stop the rapper Killer Mike from downloading the album. In addition, the app required fans to post an update to Twitter or Facebook in order to get lyrics for each track. "On some level, Jay-Z knows better," writes Jon Pareles, a music critic for The New York Times. "'Feds still lurking / They see I’m still putting work in,' he raps in a new song, 'Somewhere in America.' Yet now, it’s Jay-Z who’s lurking — in my phone." The complaints about Jay-Z's invasion of fan privacy are unrelated to the fake Magna Carta app that has been circulating.