While sources like Twitter and the internet at large have built up a reputation as the de-facto place for keeping up with breaking news, traditional media is still the dominant news source for the majority of Americans. So says a new Gallup poll — it found that 55 percent of Americans cited TV as their preferred news source. 50 percent of those in both the 18 to 29 and 30 to 49 age groups picked TV as their number one news source. The internet came in second place for both age ranges; 27 percent of those aged 18 to 29 and 28 percent of those aged 30-49 chose the internet as their preferred source.

Unsurprisingly, TV had even more of an advantage as the survey respondents aged — 58 percent of those aged 50 to 64 picked TV, while only 18 percent picked the internet. For those aged 65 and older, the internet barely registered: only 6 percent chose it has their preferred news source. TV dominated at 68 percent, while print came in second place at 18 percent. And despite Twitter's moves to become a more trusted and respected source of news, only two percent of all survey respondents said that social media sites were their preferred news source.

TV news is still the king

Reliance on TV did lessen as the education level of respondents increased, however. While TV was still the number one news source across all educational groupings, only 43 percent of post-graduates said it was their main news source, compared to 61 percent of those with high school education (or less). While post-graduates had the least reliance on TV, those who said they have a college undergraduate education were actually the group most likely to use the internet for news (32 percent). While it's evident from these findings that internet news hasn't exactly reduced the dominance of TV, it's equally clear that internet has done a good job at marginalizing the print industry — overall, 21 percent of people picked the internet as their favorite source for news, but only nine percent said the same for print.