An Apple without Steve Jobs? Larry Ellison dismissed the idea with a wave of his hand. On Tuesday's episode of CBS This Morning, Charlie Rose asks the Oracle CEO how he thought the computer company would fare without his friend Steve Jobs, and his answer was that history will repeat itself again. "Well, we already know," Ellison told Rose. "We conducted the experiment. It's been done," he continued.

"We saw Apple with Steve Jobs," said Ellison, raising a finger of a single hand to the sky in a meaningful gesture. "We saw Apple without Steve Jobs." Down came the finger again. "We saw Apple with Steve Jobs." Up went the finger as Ellison alluded to the roller coaster history of success and struggle that Apple saw over the past three decades.

"And now, we're going to see Apple without Steve Jobs," he ended, making it clear that he believes the fortunes of Apple are not long for this world without the company's mentor at hand. Ellison hasn't shied away from making bold predictions in the past: in 1993 he declared that Microsoft was the "present" and Oracle would be the "future" of computing.

Apple's stock price has been in flux for the past year or so as investors have been anxious for the company to release new, innovative devices as it had done in the past. Compared to a year ago, the price of Apple's stock is well below the highs it had been experiencing. But the impending release of a new iPhone, along with an expected lower cost model, will likely bump Apple's stock for at least a little while. Current CEO Tim Cook has alluded to wearable technology, such as smartwatches, as being a "profound opportunity" for Apple. Though the company hasn't released any wearables yet, they may be the next area for Apple to innovate in.

For all of the hay that has been made about Apple not succeeding without Steve Jobs, the company has been able to post massive revenues and profits quarter after quarter. Whether it has enough in the tank to keep going at that pace remains to be seen, but it will likely be some time before Apple completely falls apart — assuming it does at all.