Google Glass has made its way to the OR. A surgeon from Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center donned the new headset during a routine surgery last week, and streamed point-of-view footage live to a group of students on the other side of town. "I can start to appreciate the connectivity it gave me," says Dr. Christopher Kaeding, the surgeon who wore Glass. During surgery, Kaeding also consulted with a separate colleague through the headset, which Ohio State says is the first time that a live point-of-view collaboration has ever occurred during an operation using Glass.

"I often forgot the device was there."

Kaeding was performing ACL surgery on a woman who had hurt her knee while playing softball. Glass apparently didn't hinder Kaeding's performance or concentration in any way. "To be honest, once we got into the surgery, I often forgot the device was there," he says.

The university is now considering ways that Glass could be used to enhance its students' education. "As an academic medical center, we're very excited about the opportunities this device could provide for education," Dr. Clay Marsh, the medical center's chief innovation officer, says in a statement. Providing point-of-view footage from a surgeon could provide a new level of detail for medical students looking to shadow doctors as they work. Marsh also believes that Glass could be a game changer for doctors in general. "Now," he says, "we just have to start using it."