After headlines detailing smashed hard drives and international intrigue, The New Yorker takes a long look at Alan Rusbridger's tenure as editor of The Guardian, struggling with both government intimidation and the equally forceful economics of web-era publishing. After the Snowden scoop, the site is now the third-highest trafficked newspaper website in the world, but the path has not been easy. The piece details GHCQ's particularly puzzling move to destroy Guardian hard drives containing the leaked data, along with the intercontinental backup system Rusbridger devised with the help of ProPublica and The New York Times. One particularly impressive detail: At the same time that he was grappling with the British government, Rusbridger was pouring hours into the piano, trying to master Chopin's Ballade in G Minor. As one friend told The New Yorker, "It’s the same thing: 'I am quite prepared to spend hours and hours to learn Chopin. I’m prepared to spend hours and hours to get the story.'"