A White House-appointed panel will meet with privacy groups and technology company officials next week as it prepares to review American intelligence policy, says The Hill. Though the names of the companies and advocacy organizations haven't been released, they will apparently speak with the panel in two separate meetings on Monday, though the events are reportedly not official White House meetings. The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The panel, announced officially last week, is composed of several previous White House advisors and constitutional lawyers, as well as the former deputy director of the CIA. President Obama created the panel after outcry over documents exposed by Edward Snowden, calling it an "independent group" that would review not only the NSA but "our entire intelligence and communications technologies [sic]."

Since names were made public, however, his picks have been described as White House insiders who are unlikely to suggest real change, though some have strong records of work on cybersecurity and privacy. The group would almost certainly have met with technology and public interest groups before starting the review, but this rendezvous will also give the panel a chance to prove it's acting in good faith. As for the attendees, any number of companies and nonprofits could be involved, but Microsoft and Google have made a point of looking for greater transparency, and the ACLU, EPIC, and a host of other public interest groups have filed suits to end the NSA's mass collection of phone data.