UK Prime Minister David Cameron wants to clean up the internet, but his colleagues in Parliament are reportedly just fine with it the way it is. According to a report from the Huffington Post UK, nearly 300,000 attempts to access pornographic websites were made from computers on the parliamentary network over the past year, including more than 55,000 attempts in April alone. The figures were obtained from a Freedom of Information request that the website filed, though government officials dispute their accuracy.

"We do not consider the data to provide an accurate representation of the number of purposeful requests made by network users due to the variety of ways in which websites can be designed to act, react, and interact and due to the potential operation of third party software," a House of Commons spokeswoman said Wednesday in a statement to BBC News.

The statistics published Tuesday vary wildly; in January of this year, for example, more than 115,000 attempts were made, compared to just 15 in February. A House of Commons spokeswoman could not offer an explanation for such variance, and declined to elaborate on Parliament's definition of pornographic material, citing security reasons. She reiterated that some of the tally may come from third-party pop-up windows rather than deliberate requests, though she acknowledged that such content would likely not surface on mainstream websites.

This week's report comes more than a month after Cameron announced a controversial plan whereby all domestic internet service providers would block pornographic websites by default, as part of his attempt to protect children from the "corroding" influence of online smut. According to BBC News, all of the UK's major ISPs have already agreed to the proposal, covering approximately 95 percent of the country's households.