Some three months after being acquired by Google, Bump — a company that makes data sharing tools — is calling it quits. In a blog post today Bump CEO and cofounder David Lieb said that Bump and Flock will be shut down on January 31, 2014 given that the team working on it are "now deeply focused on our new projects within Google." After that date, the apps will be removed from Apple's App Store, as well as Google Play, Lieb says, but not before users have 30 days to export their data.

30 days to get your data out

Bump came onto the scene in early 2009 with a way to let smartphone users share data like contact cards and photos with one another by physically bumping their phones together. The technology was briefly integrated into PayPal's app for iPhone and Android, letting people exchange money. Bump later spun that feature out as its own payment app before turning its attention to photos with Flock, a service that would pull together photos from different devices into a single album.

There were never any promises that Bump or Flock would continue to live on after Google acquired the company in September; however, the short turnaround between acquisition and shuttering is notable. In the past, Google has waited to shut down several services at once for what it considers "spring cleaning," a process that claimed Google Reader earlier this year.