Bill Murray hit Reddit this evening to host an AMA for his fans, taking questions from the mob about life after SNL, his films, and his legend. During the session, he talked about everything from the joy of filming Fantastic Mr. Fox to the nightmare that was Garfield, while generally just sounding like a fun guy to hang out with. Charitably, he even talked about the best sandwich he ever ate in his life, because celebrity is weird.

For instance, here he has only the kindest words to say about the last cast of SNL:

They're good. I don't know them as well as I knew the previous one. But i really feel like the previous cast, that was the best group since the original group. They were my favorite group. Some really talented people that were all comedians of some kind or another. You think about Dana Carvey, Will, Hartman, all these wonderful funny guys. But the last group with Kristen Wiig and those characters, they were a bunch of actors and their stuff was just different.

Later, he talked about living in Japan while filming Lost in Translation:

I would go to sushi bars with a book I had called "Making out in Japanese." it was a small paperback book, with questions like "can we get into the back seat?" "do your parents know about me?" "do you have a curfew?"

And I would say to the sushi chef "Do you have a curfew? Do your parents know about us? And can we get into the back seat?"

But one of the best things he wrote tonight was a reflection on his comedy reaching a fan:

The best experience with a fan? It happens sometimes where someone will say "I was going through a really hard time. I was going through a really hard time, and I was just morose or depressed."

And I met one person who said I couldn't find anything to cheer me up and I was so sad. And I Just watched Caddyshack, and I watched it for about a week and it was the only thing that cheered me up. And it was the only thing that cheered me up and made me laugh and made me think that my life wasn't hopeless. That I had a way to see what was best about life, that there was a whole lot of life that was wonderful. And I happen to know (from her own spirit) that that person has really triumphed as an artist and as a human being, and if it's just a moment when you can reverse a movement, an emotion, a downward spiral, when you can quiet something or still something and just allow it to change and allow the real spirit rise up in someone, that feels great.

I know I'm not saving the world, but something in what I've learned how to do or the stories that I've tried to tell, they're some sort of representation of how life is or how life could be. And that gives some sort of optimism. And an optimistic attitude is a successful attitude.