Reddit's AMA (Ask Me Anything) Q&A sessions often provide a rare opportunity for celebrities, policy makers, and other influential figures to candidly connect with internet users. But reading them after the fact can be a chore. Reddit does its best to help: answers from AMA participants are made easier to spot thanks to bold usernames and more often than not can be found near the top of each thread. But there's still room for improvement, and that's where Interviewly comes in.

The site has collected a backlog featuring some of Reddit's best AMAs and presents them in a more traditional Q&A format that's far easier to parse. Questions are in bold, ordered chronologically, and usernames have also been stripped away since there's no mystery when it comes to who's answering them. Interviewly divides Reddit's AMA history into seven categories: film and TV, music, authors, sports, technology, politics, and other. Photos are spread throughout each interview to help break up the text, and the subject's original introduction is also included in a sidebar on the right — complete with Reddit's customary proof of an interviewee's identity.

It all makes for a much more pleasant reading experience compared to Reddit's format, which "isn't conducive to interviews" according to Interviewly creator Dan Drabik. "For now, I've focused on the interviews of well-known people, but that may expand in the future," says Drabik, whose day job is at Kickstarter. And there are no visible ads anywhere; Drabik is simply taking one of the best things about Kickstarter and doing his part to make it better.