My name is Dan Seifert and I’m addicted to cable TV.

Last fall, I tried to break that addiction. I became one of the growing number of Americans to cancel their cable TV service. I went from a couple hundred channels to zero. I’ll have lots of free time, I said. Maybe I’ll even catch up on my ever-expanding Pocket queue. I bought a Roku 3 and signed up for Netflix, Hulu Plus, and Aereo, so I could catch both the Super Bowl and the next season of House of Cards. I became a cord-cutter.

But my cable-free life didn’t last very long. Less than six months later, I was on the phone with my cable company scheduling a visit to have everything hooked back up. A combination of a sweetheart “come back to us” offer from my local cable provider and the frustration of not being able to watch the things I actually did want to see (any customer of Aereo knows trying to watch something like the Oscars live is an futile endeavor) sent me running back into the comfortable arms of channel surfing. I was back on the sauce.

Now Amazon is trying its hand at helping me to break my addiction. Its new Fire TV is the latest media-streaming box expected to take down the cable monopolies. It has stiff competition from Roku, Apple, and even Google, but Amazon promises to offer a better experience than anything I’ve seen before. Oh, and it has games. Real games that are fun to play, not the ultra-simple games that are available on the Roku 3. At $99, it’s almost an impulse buy, and if it can truly let me cut the cord, that upfront cost is nothing compared to what I save by canceling a monthly cable bill.

I’ve got the the Fire TV hooked up to my TV and it looks like it has promise. I might be able to kick this habit after all.