Google users across Europe are already demanding that the company erase links about them from its search engine. According to BBC News, new takedown requests have already come in from a politician trying to shore up his image as he seeks re-election and "a man convicted of possessing child abuse images" has also asked that links pointing to pages about his case be wiped away.

The Wall Street Journal notes that Hamburg, Germany is already seeing an uptick in attempts to cover up unflattering search results. Regulators there received eight requests just one day after a European court ruled that users have "the right to be forgotten" and can ask Google to pull down links leading to irrelevant or outdated content. Normally, Hamburg only sees 100 such requests in an entire year.

Google is reportedly already working out a system that will allow European users to scrub away personal search results. One German regulator told The Wall Street Journal that the company has promised to have a solution in place within two weeks. If true, Google is moving quickly — especially since the ruling was somewhat vague and didn't offer much guidance. The surprise decision has been blasted by critics concerned about its censorship implications, yet hailed by EU privacy advocates. Immediately after learning of the case's outcome, Google described it as disappointing "for search engines and online publishers in general."