After additional deliberations, the jury who decided the second month-long trial between Apple and Samsung last week awarded Apple an additional $4.02 million for damages involving Samsung's Galaxy S2 smartphone and an Apple patent covering an autocorrect feature, reports Recode. However the group also readjusted damages figures from other parts of the form, resulting in a total amount that did not change.

The jury left the box blank

That Galaxy S2 smartphone was found to infringe Apple's ‘647 patent, which turns addresses and phone numbers into links. In its calculations, however, the group did not include damages related to a separate Apple patent, one that automatically completes and corrects words as users are typing. District Court Judge Lucy Koh decided Samsung was infringing on that patent as part of a separate decision back in January, but the jury left the box blank in its initial decision, and was sent back to correct the form. The group opted to finish it today instead of staying into the night last week.

In its second passthrough, the jury changed changed the blank box for the Galaxy S2 to $4.02 million, along with adding an extra $1.83 million for the damages on the Galaxy S2 Epic 4G Touch. It also trimmed the damages it assigned to the Galaxy S2 Skyrocket variant, going from $5.85 million to $1.17 million, and doing the same with Samsung's Stratosphere phone, from $2.67 million to $1.49 million.

In a statement, Samsung said it was both happy and disappointed with the final verdict.

"We agree with the jury's decision to reject Apple's grossly exaggerated damages claim. Although we are disappointed by the finding of infringement, we are vindicated that for the second time in the U.S., Apple has been found to infringe Samsung's patents," the company said in a statement. "It is our long history of innovation and commitment to consumer choice, that has driven us to become the leader in the mobile industry today."

Separately, Samsung's outside counsel John Quinn said the company would be asking for the $119.6 million figure be reduced, in post-trial efforts:

Of course we're pleased that the jury awarded Apple 6% of what they were asking for. But even that can't stand, because Apple kept out all the real world evidence and didn't produce anything to substitute for it, so you have a verdict that's unsupported by evidence - and that's just one of its problems. In post-trial motions and on appeal, we will ask the judge and the federal circuit to cut the 6% verdict to 0, which is where it should end.

We can keep fighting, or Apple can decide to go back to competing with Samsung in the marketplace.

Apple reiterated its statement from last week, saying the ruling "reinforces what courts around the world have already found: that Samsung willfully stole our ideas and copied our products."

In an 11th hour decision last Friday just five minutes before their daily cutoff, jurors rendered their verdict, finding that both companies had infringed on one another's patents. It found Samsung had infringed on two of Apple's patents, and that Apple had infringed on one of two Samsung's patents. As a result, Samsung owed Apple $119,625,000, while Apple owed Samsung $158,400. Those figures are minuscule compared to the $2.191 billion and $6.2 million Apple and Samsung wanted, respectively.

The final damages could still change

Even with this adjusted verdict in, the numbers are still not final. Seven months after the first trial between the two companies wrapped up, Judge Koh trimmed $450.5 million off the original $1.05 billion judgment, and required a retrial for that amount. After the week-long retrial that followed, the final figure was changed to $939.8 million.

Update May 5th, 2:44PM: To note that $4 million figure for the '647 patent does not change total amount after recalculations elsewhere on the verdict form.

Update May 5th, 3:01PM: Adds comment from Samsung and Apple.

Update May 5th, 4:17PM: Adds comment from Samsung's outside counsel John Quinn.

Update May 5th, 4:55PM: Adds additional details from, and a copy of final amended verdict form.