Samsung's gadget playbook is pretty obvious to anybody who’s been watching. It has created a relatively stable (if uninspiring) design language, chosen plastic as its preferred material, and cranked out device after device — each one based on small, iterative technological updates to the previous models. That's been the strategy for the Galaxy S line of phones for several years running, and it's the strategy that has led the company to release 11 different tablets since the beginning of 2014.

It's easy to look down on Samsung and the tablets it relentlessly churns out. It's practically impossible for anybody but the techiest of tech geeks to remember the tiny differences between them, especially since they all look basically the same. Flooding the market with subtly different variations on the same tablet, hoping that one of them will catch fire, doesn't seem like a great plan.

Which bring us to the Galaxy Tab S. Two of them actually, with 8.4-inch and 10.5-inch displays ($399 and $499, respectively). Each is designed around a core technology that's definitely impressive: a Super AMOLED screen. But whatever the reason behind Samsung's need to keep throwing tablet spaghetti against the wall, I'm hoping to see some real function behind all that pixel flash.