Driving home at rush hour can be rough, but your situation may not be all that bad compared to commuters in cities like Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Honolulu. Those three locations topped TomTom's measurements of the most congested cities in the United States, which it released today as part of a broader look at traffic congestion in the Americas, Europe, and elsewhere in the world.

The US hardly has it worst

TomTom measured the percent increase in travel time that each city's drivers see during peak hours, finding that LA and SF topped the list with time increases of 36 percent and 32 percent, respectively. The rest of the top 10 US cities fell into the 20s, with New York and San Jose in the middle with 26 percent increases.

While that's hardly something you'd want to subject yourself to, those cities don't have it the worst. TomTom measures that those cities aren't even the worst in the Americas, which see Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City come out on top with a respective 55 percent and 54 percent increases in travel time. And those still pale to Moscow, which tops the European charts with a 74 percent time increase.

While that certainly signals a need for improved infrastructure in these cities, TomTom is using these frustrating figures to remind people what a good navigation system can do to help too. In particular, it says that its systems are able to route drivers around congested roads during peak hours, which should decrease times for everyone by getting drivers onto emptier roads and by decreasing use of the major ones.