Welcome to The Verge: Weekender edition. Every Saturday, we'll bring you some of the best and most important reads of the past seven days, from original reports, to in-depth features, to reviews and interviews. Think of it as a collection of some of our favorite pieces that you may have missed — or that you may just want to read again. You can follow along below, or keep up to date on Flipboard.

  • Report

    The cyborg era begins next week at the World Cup

    The first kick of the World Cup will be made by a paralyzed person in a mind-controlled exoskeleton that allows them to walk. It's a huge moment for integrating electronics with humans, and there's a lot more to come from here on out.

  • Video

    Top Shelf: I, Spy

    Want to see the real spy gadgets that private investigators use to track their subjects? We caught up with a PI to find out, and then did a little spying of our own to see just what it's like to use them.

  • Review

    'Edge of Tomorrow' review

    Edge of Tomorrow is a sci-fi take on Groundhog Day that has the potential to be one of the most thrilling movies of the summer. Is this just the latest Tom Cruise action film, or can Edge of Tomorrow's death-defying conceit create something far more powerful?

  • Editorial

    Meet the new Apple

    Apple made some big announcements this week about the future of iOS and OS X (all of which you can catch up on right here). But the biggest news may not have been any product, but the changed personality of Apple itself. So meet the new Apple: one that's willing to start having some fun.

  • Report

    If violence is in your genes, should courts be more lenient?

    Genetic evidence that can explain a criminal's violent actions could be a big help for courts, but right now, courts aren't quite sure how to use it. In the meantime, this evidence is being used to get lesser sentences for criminals, and legal experts don't think that logic adds up.

  • Report

    Calorie counting leads to bad science and worse gadgets

    Calorie counting has become a key component of diets and health tech, but it probably isn't doing very much good. It's difficult to actually measure how many calories a person gets out of a meal, and that means those watching their health are basing their diets on some strange science.

  • Review

    LG G3 review

    LG's latest phone is big and awkward, but it has a whole lot to love underneath. The G3 is polished in just about every way, and even though it doesn't carry the good looks of the One or the brand power of the Galaxy S5, it still may stand above them as the best Android phone this year.

  • Photo Essay

    See a fashion icon take on Google Glass

    Google Glass has never really looked cool, but Google's hoping that fashion icon Diane von Furstenberg can help. She and Google are partnering on a line of hip (and sometimes futuristic) frames for Glass. We dropped by their unveiling to photograph the new looks.

  • Report

    Textual healing: are apps the future of therapy?

    What if you could pick up your phone and anonymously text a therapist at any time of the day? That's what Talkspace thinks will be the future of therapy, but it'll have to prove that your phone's convenience is more important than getting to speak with someone face to face first.

  • Report

    F bombs and death threats: Americans rip the FCC on net neutrality

    The FCC is currently taking public comments on its controversial net neutrality proposal, and Americans have been quick to express their displeasure with it. We've rounded up some of the strangest, angriest, and most inappropriate comments made so far in order to tell the FCC that it needs to rethink its proposal.