Google may be planning to alert users whenever search results have been wiped away thanks to a controversial European court ruling. That decision, handed down last month, has allowed Europeans to censor search by asking Google to pull down "irrelevant" and otherwise sensitive personal results. It's referred to as "the right to be forgotten," but Google seems to think web users also have a right to know when their search experience has been altered. If implemented, The Guardian says these notifications would resemble existing alerts that Google displays if results have been hidden in response to copyright complaints. Google could also shine a light on personal takedown requests in its transparency reports.

Thus far Google has received over 40,000 requests to erase personal content. The company has developed a form where the public can send in requests to have results pulled, and it's also assembled an advisory committee that will oversee the effort to ensure the censorship isn't getting out of hand. Google CEO Larry Page has warned that the decision could ultimately harm innovation and be used "for bad things" by repressive governments.