Microsoft has begun accepting requests to remove results on Bing for searches on some individuals in Europe. The move follows similar changes by Google, after a landmark ruling by the European Union Court of Justice determined that it's Google and Microsoft’s responsibility to remove outdated or "irrelevant" search results hosted by third parties. Microsoft’s request form includes questions about requestors roles in society, and requires ID to verify individuals.

While Microsoft has remained quiet on the EU ruling, Google has publicly stated its problems with the judgement, saying that it contradicts the information on freedom of expression in the UN's Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and that the language used by the court means the removal of results comes after "very vague and subjective tests" as to whether the information is of public interest. Google has received more than 70,000 takedown requests since May, covering 250,000 webpages. Yahoo, another popular search engine provider, has not yet provided its own take-down form. “In light of the European Court of Justice decision, our team is currently in the process of developing a solution for Yahoo users in Europe that we believe balances the important privacy and freedom of expression interests,” said a Yahoo spokeserson in a statement to PC World.