Motorola Droid RAZR

Verge Review

The Droid RAZR is one of those rare phones that qualifies as a leap forward in hardware design and engineering. Sure, other handsets have higher-resolution displays and faster processors, but only the Droid RAZR squeezes a full set of competitive state-of-the-art specs and an LTE radio into a body just .28-inches thick — a profile thinner than any other modern smartphone available. Even more remarkably, the RAZR has a bigger battery than the Droid Bionic inside its ultraslim case. In other...

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Basic Specs

Thickness 0.28 inches
Weight 0.28 pounds
Form factor Slab
Screen size (diagonal) 4.3 inches
Carriers Verizon Wireless
Operating system Android
Launch OS version 2.3.5

Recent News

No recent news about Motorola Droid RAZR.

Recent Discussions

No recent discussions about Motorola Droid RAZR.

Tech Specs

Also Known As...

Alias XT912

Hardware

Height 5.15 inches
Width 2.71 inches
Thickness 0.28 inches
Weight 0.28 pounds
Form factor Slab
Color Purple / Black, Blue, Black
Loudspeaker Mono

Display

Screen size (diagonal) 4.3 inches
Technology Super AMOLED
Resolution (Y) 960 px
Resolution (X) 540 px
PPI 256
Touchscreen type Capacitive

Connectivity

Carriers Verizon Wireless
CDMA Yes
CDMA frequencies supported 1900, 800 / 850
LTE Yes
LTE frequencies supported 700
Wi-Fi Yes
Wi-Fi support 802.11n, 802.11g, 802.11b
GPS Yes
Bluetooth Yes
Bluetooth version Bluetooth 4.0
Tethering / mobile hotspot Yes
Media streaming DLNA

Processor

Manufacturer TI
Brand / family OMAP 4
Model OMAP4430
Clock speed 1.2 GHz
Number of cores 2

GPU

Manufacturer Imagination Technologies
Model PowerVR SGX540

Memory

RAM size 1 GB

Storage

Internal size 16 GB
External Yes
Max external size 32 GB
External type microSD

Front Camera

Resolution 1.3 megapixels

Rear Camera

Resolution 8 megapixels
Flash LED
Focus type Autofocus
Video resolution 1080p
Video framerate 30

Software

Operating system Android
Skin Motorola
Launch OS version 2.3.5

Interface

Video out Yes
Headphone jack 3.5mm
Other ports Micro USB, Micro HDMI

Sensors

Sensors Compass (Magnetometer), Proximity, Ambient light, Accelerometer

Battery

Capacity 1780 mAh

Bundled accessories

Bundled accessories 16GB microSD card

Recent News

No recent news about Motorola Droid RAZR.

Recent Discussions

No recent discussions about Motorola Droid RAZR.

8.5

Average User Review

of 2 total reviews
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  • Design 10
  • Display 8
  • Camera(s) 7
  • Reception / call quality 10
  • Performance 9
  • Software 8
  • Battery life 6
  • Ecosystem 9

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  • 9.0
    Show all User reviews

    Reviewed by tdubrpdx (Currently owns)

    The Motorola RAZR shows just what is possible with modern smartphone engineering. Built with a stainless steel frame, kevlar backing and Corning Gorilla Glass, the phone is astonishingly thin, light and solidly built. You notice immediately the premium quality feel when you hold it in your hands, During daily use Motorola's reputation for great call quality and top of the line radio signal are also evident. In terms of the operating system, Motoblur is incredibly light, fast, and in many cases an improvement over stock android. Unlike the CPU heavy HTC Sense or the iOS-like Samsung Touchwiz, the version of Motoblur running on the RAZR is minimalistic and unencumbered.

    The main drawbacks for this phone begin with the lack of Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich(Currently running 2.3.5 Gingerbread), although Motorola has promised a software update early next year. The camera is a step up from previous Motorola phones although it is still behind compared to the one on the HTC Rezound and Apple's iPhone 4s. The pictures are still quite good however, and the shutter speed is very quick. Battery life on the RAZR is no different than that of the rest of the current crop of 4G LTE phones although the RAZR's exclusive Smart Actions app helps to efficiently manage battery use. The lack of a removable battery may be an issue for power users use to swapping batteries on the fly.

    The SuperAMOLED Advanced display on the RAZR is honestly one of the best looking displays on the market today, despite the negative review on this site. Setting aside the pros and cons of using a pentile display, you will not easily notice a difference in everyday use between this and the Galaxy Nexus's pentile 720p display. In fact, I and many other users have noticed a blue-green hue to the Nexus display that is absent on the RAZR. RAZR viewing angles are impressive and its color contrast tops current LCD offerings.

    To sum things up, the Droid RAZR by Motorola is not a perfect phone. Every phone has noticeable drawbacks that you'll need to weigh the importance of when making your decision. You will not find a better phone on Verizon in terms of call quality, data signal strength, GPS accuracy, design, durability, and accessories. When it receives Android 4.0 early next year it will be the complete package.

    The Breakdown

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    • Design 10
    • Display 9
    • Camera(s) 7
    • Reception / call quality 10
    • Performance 9
    • Software 9
    • Battery life 7
    • Ecosystem 8
    Show the rest of this review and the breakdown
  • 8.0
    Show all User reviews

    Reviewed by Someguyperson (Previously owned)

    Design:
    Motorola really sells on hardware and it shows. This is an extremely thin phone with a very rigid design. The screen has a fantastic oleophobic and water resistant coating that works wonderfully and feels great. The glossy edges deform on impact, making the edges look bad after some abuse. The metal finishes also wear off quickly, making the handset look cheaper after wear and tear. The dimensions of the phone make the phone feel massive in the hand as well as distract the user from the thickness and focus on the width of the handset instead. The “Motorola hump” is a distinctive, but putting the weight at the top of the device really adds an unnecessary heft to the phone.

    Display:
    The display really isn’t as bad as Nilay makes it out to be. The blacks are terrific and the screen is very bright for an AMOLED screen. The colours are completely off (even by AMOLED standards) and the AMOLED “banding” problem is quite prevalent. The screen is also not big enough for the device. I feel Motorola really skimped on the screen size in order to decrease the thickness, which doesn’t make sense to the end user.

    Camera(s):
    I didn’t use the cameras much, but they did what was required of them. They don’t look that great at all, but they could definitely beat out my grandmother’s point-and-shoot. Think of them as the 128kbps MP3s of pictures, if that makes any sense.

    Reception/ Call Quality:
    The speeds on LTE are great and CDMA 2000 works as advertised. The issue is that the LTE modem is a category 2 device, meaning its theoretical maximum speed is half that of all non-Motorola handsets in Verizon’s lineup.

    Performance:
    Performance was great and is near the top of the charts right now. The time it takes to send a text decreased dramatically from handsets like the OG Droid and Atrix to the RAZR.

    Software:
    Motorola decreased the bloat on this skin compared to the Atrix and HTC devices. I enjoyed the stock keyboard, but the dictionary wiped itself and setting up Google/ Facebook/ Twitter accounts are an extreme pain because of the modifications made.

    Battery Life:
    Miserable battery life. The charger needed to be kept close by, as the handset would drain completely in ~7-8hrs in idle. There is clearly an issue with the handset requesting data too often and inefficiently that the Galaxy Nexus doesn’t have. It takes 3-4hrs to fully charge with the device on and the lack of extended battery really hampers the phone’s ability.

    Ecosystem:
    The Android ecosystem is second only to iOS and is approaching the same level within a year or two.

    Conclusion:
    The RAZR is a engineering feat, but some poor design tradeoffs, miserable battery life, and software that will always come out after the Galaxy Nexus are all reasons that this device places second in Verizon’s lineup next to the Galaxy Nexus.

    The Breakdown

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    • Design 9
    • Display 7
    • Camera(s) 7
    • Reception / call quality 9
    • Performance 9
    • Software 7
    • Battery life 5
    • Ecosystem 9
    Show the rest of this review and the breakdown
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