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'Scanners' cover art from the Criterion Collection edition by Connor Williumsen
'Scanners' cover art from the Criterion Collection edition by Connor Williumsen
Courtesy the Criterion Collection

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See the mind-blowing box art for the new edition of 'Scanners' from the Criterion Collection

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1981 was a great year for cinema. Just take a look at the most popular films released then: Raiders of the Lost Ark, The Evil Dead, Escape from New York, Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior, to name a few. But often overlooked is the cult classic Scanners, gore-master David Cronenberg's breakout film about psychic warriors.

That shouldn't be the case anymore. Scanners is getting a beautiful new home edition (Blu-ray, DVD, and iTunes) from the Criterion Collection, complete with all new, mind-blowing box art from illustrator Connor Willumsen. Willumsen says that each illustration is a collage of several different pencil drawings. The artist was inspired by photography tropes, cubism, and the film itself. "The movie's fundamental premise is that some people have the ability to overlap their nervous systems remotely and can therefore share all of their experience and feeling simultaneously," Willumsen explains. "The idea seemed appropriate and natural."

The new Criterion Collection edition contains a restored 2K digital transfer of the film supervised by Cronenberg himself and is bursting with special features, including a special effects documentary, a new interview with lead villain Michael Ironside, and even a restored 2K edition of Cronenberg's first feature, Stereo. It's also available now for half-off at Barnes & Noble and iTunes. That should be enough to make any cinephile's brain...well, you get the picture.


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