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Leica announces new premium compacts, a film rangefinder, and some Panasonic rebrands

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Meet new versions of the X, D-Lux, and V-Lux

Leica's Photokina announcements don't stop with the unique, screenless digital M Edition 60 — the German camera maker has a series of more conventional digital models on the way. First up is the X (Type 113) and X-E (Type 102, above), premium compact cameras with 16-megapixel APS-C sensors that follow on from the X1 and X2. The X-E doesn't appear to be a huge advance on its predecessor, similarly featuring a 24mm f/2.8 lens, but the X has a 23mm f/1.7 lens, beating out Fujifilm's popular f/2 X100 series. The Leica cameras have no optical or electronic viewfinder built in, however, and only the X is capable of shooting video.

Leica's Panasonic rebrands continue

Leica is also returning to its familiar tactic of rebranding popular Panasonic compact cameras. The new Leica V-Lux (Typ 114) appears to be the same as Panasonic's FZ1000 superzoom, and the D-Lux (Typ 109) is clearly based on the Japanese company's impressive new Lumix LX100. Pricing information is as yet unavailable, but if history is any guide you'll be paying extra for a sleeker design, a red-dot logo, and some bundled photography software.

And if digital still isn't your thing, you might be interested in the new Leica M-A, a fully mechanical film rangefinder camera that shares much in common with the existing Leica MP. It's being issued as part of the same 60th anniversary celebration as the M Edition 60, and will come bundled with Kodak Tri-X 400 monochrome film — another product that made its debut in 1954. It'll be out next month.

Finally, the new Leica T mirrorless camera is getting a pair of new lenses, doubling the somewhat meagre range of optics available for the system. The 11-23mm f/3.5-4.5 wide-angle and 55-135mm f/3.5-4.5 telephoto lenses will give T shooters more options in terms of focal length, but the slow zoom lenses aren't likely to appeal to those who appreciate Leica's traditional fast primes.