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iPhone 6 and Apple Watch event: all the news from Apple's big event in Cupertino

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The September 9th Apple event was one for the ages. The long-rumored Apple Watch finally debuted, along with two new variants of the iPhone 6. Stay tuned to this StoryStream for every news update, hands-on, in-depth report and more!

  • Sam Byford

    Sep 12, 2014

    Sam Byford

    The iPhone 6 is available to pre-order

    Apple's latest smartphones, the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, are now available to pre-order from carriers around the world. Shipping and in-store pickups are set for next Friday, September 19th, but as ever with iPhones you might want to act fast to secure the model you want. Stock of the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus in particular may be thin on the ground, if various reports are to be believed.

    As of this writing, access to Apple's online store appears to be very limited and you will likely have better luck with carriers. For all the information you need on how and where you can pick up your phone, read our guide below.

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  • Dieter Bohn

    Sep 10, 2014

    Dieter Bohn

    Apple Pay was this week's most revolutionary product

    If you’ve paid any attention at all to the mobile payments space, you’ll know that one of the most notable pieces of news recently is that the consortium of carrier oligarchs trying to create a payment system rebranded from ISIS to Softcard so that it wouldn’t be associated with the militant group. The irony is thick enough to spread with a spatula, but that’s just the frosting on top of the multi-layered shit cake that has comprised the mobile payments industry so far.

    Paying with your phone has always been a confusing mess. It has always been a financial cold war between credit card companies, banks, phone companies, and phone manufacturers fighting to divert a tiny rivulet of the humongous river of money that flows through credit cards every day. Incompatible and confusing systems proliferate and vary depending on country, region, carrier, and who makes your phone. The result: incompatible and confusing systems that are hard to understand and even harder to successfully use.

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  • Josh Lowensohn

    Sep 10, 2014

    Josh Lowensohn

    Sprint angling iPhone 6 buyers with new 'iPhone for Life' leasing plan

    If you're the type of person who buys a new iPhone every time one is announced, Sprint wants your money — and your phone when you're done with it. Today the carrier announced a new "iPhone for Life" program that will give you a free Apple iPhone 6 or 6 Plus up front, as long as you pay $20 a month to lease it. When you're done, you turn it back in, paying about $480 over the course of a 2-year contract, a figure that can go up if you choose to lease a higher capacity model.

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  • Sep 9, 2014

    Vlad Savov

    For Apple, one size no longer fits all

    It used to be so simple. Steve Jobs would take the stage and tell us all exactly what it is that we'll desire and buy over the coming months. Choice was an unnecessary evil. There was just one iPad, one iPhone, and fewer customization options across the entire Mac line than you'd find on a single Dell PC order page. In one of his more humorous presentations, the Apple chief even poked fun at Microsoft's tiered Windows pricing by detailing five "different" versions of Mac OS X Leopard, each one costing $129. "Seriously, we have one version of Leopard, it's got everything in it," said Jobs, "and we hope you love it as much as we do." But now things are different.

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  • Ellis Hamburger

    Sep 9, 2014

    Ellis Hamburger

    Apple, please don't screw up notifications on the Apple Watch

    Notifications are some of the most fragile but important elements of our digital lives today. Some apps use them as a one-bit communication medium, while others use them to ping you with each and every comment on your latest photo. But there's one thing every notification does, which is make your phone beep, vibrate, or at the very least light up. With an Apple Watch, your wrist is now the thing vibrating. But a watch isn't as easy to ignore as the phone in your pocket. Without some smart software and user education, the Apple Watch could be Apple's most annoying gadget ever.

    Having easy access to notifications is one of the most desirable features of a smartwatch, but today's generation of devices haven't done a great job helping you configure which notifications you want on your phone, and which ones you want on your wrist. Pebble shows every single notification that hits your iPhone, which isn't optimal, and Android Wear goes a step further, letting you prevent specific apps from reaching your wrist, but these watches need to do more. They need to understand that a retweet isn't worth buzzing your wrist about, but a DM from your good friend is.

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  • How does the Apple Watch stack up against Android Wear?

    Apple unveiled its big attempt at defining what a smartwatch should look like today with the introduction of the Apple Watch. There are already quite a few competitors vying to define what should go on your wrist, however: Google beat Apple to the punch just a few months ago by releasing Android Wear, and watches powered by it have been hitting stores all summer.

    Update: Read our review of Apple Watch.

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  • Carl Franzen

    Sep 9, 2014

    Carl Franzen

    Are you considering replacing your fitness tracker with an Apple Watch?

    Sure, it's called the Apple Watch, but the wearable gadget unveiled in Cupertino today and scheduled for an early 2015 release does far more than keep the time. Apple CEO Tim Cook made a big deal about promoting the Apple Watch's health, lifestyle, and fitness tracking features, which include giving you personalized goals and keeping track of three different broad categories of activities: moving, exercising, and standing. And as my colleague Ben Popper found out, analysts are already predicting the Apple Watch will dominate the growing fitness tracking hardware industry (A Forrester Research study found that 24 percent of US adults plan on purchasing a wearable device sometime in the next year).

    There's no doubt that if it is released with all the features shown off today, the Apple Watch will be one of the most comprehensive and complex fitness bands on the market. Of course, it's also trying to compete with previously announced rival smartwatches running Google's Android Wear, but so far, those only offer very basic pedometer and heart rate measuring features. And as a recent convert to the Jawbone Up24 (The Verge's top choice in fitness trackers), I'm not entirely sure I'm ready to ditch my light, minimalistic wristband in favor of the flashier, chunkier Apple Watch I've seen from afar (I do think it looks quite appealing, though). Now that the Apple Watch has been announced, if you're looking for a device that's going to be used mainly for activity tracking, which would you pick?

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  • Kwame Opam

    Sep 9, 2014

    Kwame Opam

    Apple rolls out new iCloud Drive pricing with up to a terabyte of storage

    Making good on its announcement made at WWDC earlier this year, Apple quietly revealed the new, cheaper pricing scheme for iCloud Drive today. The new system puts Apple's cloud service on even footing with the competition —complete with the option for a full terabyte of space — though the cost for more storage is still a bit more expensive than what Dropbox and others offer.

    According to the Apple website, iCloud Drive offers a range of monthly plans that's considerably cheaper than Apple's original annual pricing scheme. Confirming June's announcement, users can opt for a free 5GB, pay $0.99 per month for 20GB of space, or $3.99 a month for 200GB. The new options of 500GB and 1TB of storage are now available for $9.99 and $19.99 a month, respectively. Those plans, however, are already more costly compared to Dropbox and Google Drive's services, which offers a terabyte for $9.99. Those prices on top of the scrutiny iCloud has received recently over Celebgate make it unclear what kind of adoption Apple can expect when iCloud Drive officially drops alongside iOS and OS X Yosemite.

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  • Kwame Opam

    Sep 9, 2014

    Kwame Opam

    Watch all the videos Apple played today

    Apple truly had one of its biggest events in years at the Flint Center earlier today. But one of the best parts of these unveilings is always the videos the company produces for its new and improved products. With two new iPhones and the Apple Watch to build up hype for — along with a new U2 album to get excited about — Apple made no fewer than nine new spots. Watch them all here.

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  • Sep 9, 2014

    Colin Lecher

    Poll: Are you buying a next-gen iPhone? What about an Apple Watch?

    It's over. Apple made a few huge announcements today: the company unveiled two new iPhones and the all-new Apple Watch. The only question left is: How many people will buy them?

    Admittedly, it's early; the three products were just announced. But some people have already made up their minds. If you're one of them (or haven't decided) cast a vote here.

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  • Dan Seifert

    Sep 9, 2014

    Dan Seifert

    Apple Watch's battery life is a mystery and that's a problem

    Apple announced its first wearable today, the new Apple Watch. It's packed with a lot of features, including voice controls, tight integration with the iPhone, custom notifications, and support for Apple Pay, the company's new payments platform. It's going to be available next year starting at $349.

    Update: Read our Apple Watch review.

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  • Russell Brandom

    Sep 9, 2014

    Russell Brandom

    The most important feature Apple didn't talk about today

    Today's event offered Apple fans a lot to get excited about: a new kind of watch, a huge iPhone and a new way to pay for things, for a start. But there was one topic where the company stayed almost completely silent. Just a week after attackers penetrated iCloud, stealing private photos from the service’s most famous users, Apple made no reference to new security features, or plans to lock down its massive infrastructure.

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  • Nathan Ingraham

    Sep 9, 2014

    Nathan Ingraham

    U2 releases its new album for free today exclusively on iTunes

    Rumors have been flying for the better part of the week, and now it's confirmed — Tim Cook just name-dropped U2 on stage and the band is jumping on stage now to perform a new song entitled "The Miracle (Of Joey Ramone)" from its brand-new album Songs of Innocence. After performing, Bono joked that the band has made "several albums" in the last few years but hadn't made one that it felt was worth releasing — until today.

    Now, the band is using Apple's event to officially announce Songs of Innocence — and the band is releasing it today, exclusively on iTunes, for free. It's very much like Beyonce's surprise album release last December, though with the notable difference that it is for free. If you have an iTunes Store account, it'll show up today in 119 countries, and it'll be exclusive to iTunes and Beats Music through October 13th. Anyone who signs up to the iTunes Store in the next five weeks will receive a copy, as well. Indeed, the album is already showing up in the "purchased" section of iTunes users just moments after the announcement.

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  • Sep 9, 2014

    Verge Staff

    The 15 most important announcements from the Apple Watch, iPhone 6 event

    A big iPhone, mobile payments, and a smartwatch -- Apple has finally delivered on three of its most longstanding promises about the future of its mobile business. The 4.7-inch iPhone 6 is now accompanied by the 5.5-inch 6 Plus, and both models come with NFC and the “Apple Pay” tap-to-pay system. And the Apple Watch is ready to compete with Google’s Android Wear, with a range of customizable designs and a completely new interface.

    Update: Read our Apple Watch review.

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  • Sep 9, 2014

    Colin Lecher

    Apple Watch uses 'digital touch' system for wordless communication

    One of the unanswered questions of the just announced Apple Watch was this: How would people communicate with such a small screen? Now we have the answer: with "digital touch," a program that encourages communication without words.

    Rather than attempting to, say, text a message on the watch, you can tap a message: the watch can detect when you push its pressure sensors, then buzz the device of the person you're talking to accordingly.

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  • Chris Welch

    Sep 9, 2014

    Chris Welch

    Apple Watch release coming 'early next year', priced starting at $349

    The just-unveiled Apple Watch will launch early next year starting at $349. It's the first truly new breakout product for Apple since the iPad in 2010, and the company revealed it in grand fashion today. Apple's take on the smartwatch features a radically new user interface primarily controlled by what the company calls its "Digital Crown," a knob on the side of the Apple Watch that allows users to magnify content, scroll down lists, make selections, and return to the home screen without touching or obstructing the screen. Naturally, you'll need an iPhone to use it.

    Available in a variety of sizes incorporating different materials like stainless steel, aluminum, and 18-karat gold, the Apple Watch also features a flexible Retina display that's better at recognizing touch input. Apple says the watch can be customized in "millions" of ways, and the software puts a focus on communicating in "more intimate" ways: you're able to share personal details like your heartbeat with others (they'll even feel your heartbeat via vibrations from their own watch), or fire off whimsical sketches to fellow Apple Watch wearers. Apple is also making a huge fitness push with new apps like Activity and Workout. But other Apple mainstays like Siri and support for messages, Apple Maps, and other features are also built in.

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  • Ellis Hamburger

    Sep 9, 2014

    Ellis Hamburger

    Activity and Workout apps for Apple Watch track your moves 24/7

    The new Activity and Workout apps for the new Apple Watch uses a variety of onboard sensors to measure your movement and heart rate, and even your GPS location with some help from your iPhone. "The Activity app monitors movement throughout the day," says Apple. "The Workout app tracks dedicated workouts."

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  • Sep 9, 2014

    Colin Lecher

    Apple Watch apps and partnerships announced, powered by 'WatchKit'

    Apple now has an entirely new category of device on its hands with the Apple Watch, meaning it'll need a robust group of third-party developers working to power it. Apple's always been the best at roping in high-profile teams, and now the first round of its new partnerships is here, powered by the company's special developer program for the watch: WatchKit.

    The company reeled off a long list of third-party partnerships as part of the announcement. The third-party apps include social: you can check your Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest in a watch-optimized format using the system. Those were expected; some others were less so. You'll also be able to find your car using a BMW app, check out scores with the MLB app, and even control the temperature in your home with a Honeywell app.If you're heading out on a run, you can tell friends with a Nike app. If you'd rather fly, there's an American Airlines app that works by touch.

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  • Apple Watch uses four sensors to detect your pulse

    One of the most distinct elements of the new Apple Watch is a set of four rings built into its backside, but they're hardly there for style: inside those four rings are sensors that the Apple Watch uses to measure its wearer's pulse. The sensors include infrared and visible-light LEDS in addition to photosensors, which all work together to detect heart rate. Using that information, Apple says that it can begin to put together a comprehensive look at a person's daily activity.

    Though Apple is putting a focus on these four rear heart-rate sensors, there's a bit more than that at play. There's an accelerometer inside the watch that's likely used for tracking movement. And since the watch is connected to an iPhone, it also uses the phone's Wi-Fi and GPS data to see where you're going. There's a whole suit of health features built in as well, giving wearer's fitness goals and telling them how many calories they've burned.

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  • Dan Seifert

    Sep 9, 2014

    Dan Seifert

    Apple Watch will come in small and large versions

    After such a long wait for just one iWatch, Apple has surprised everyone by revealing two new wearable devices. The two new Apple Watch models have the same design and offer the same features, but are available in two sizes, one 38mm (small) and one 42mm (large). Apple Watch will start at $349 when it is available for purchase early next year.

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  • Nathan Ingraham

    Sep 9, 2014

    Nathan Ingraham

    Apple Watch will use wireless MagSafe charging

    Apple is showing off a video full of details on the long-anticipated Apple Watch, and it sounds like the company is bringing wireless charging to one of its mobile products for the first time. The Apple Watch will use a MagSafe-style wireless charger — it's inductive and magnetically snaps right on to the back of the Watch. It appears to work pretty much like any other wireless charger out there, but it's still a nice feature to include on a device that you'll probably need to charge every day. Apple hasn't mentioned battery life for its Watch just yet, but with a bright and colorful screen like Apple is showing off, it'll likely need to charged on the regular.

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  • Kwame Opam

    Sep 9, 2014

    Kwame Opam

    The new Apple Watch will have a scratch-resistant sapphire display that can detect force

    Apple just announced that its new Watch will sport a high-quality sapphire Retina display that serves as a touchscreen and can detect force, a new paradigm for interfaces on wearables that pervades the entire UI. Apple touted the capabilities of the new screen during the announcement, saying the device can determine between a tap and a press.

    Apple VP Kevin Lynch demoed the device onstage, explaining the new Force Touch feature. Force touches are essentially new gestures that allow the user to better customize the device and dive deeper into the interface. It's a new idea, and we're curious how intuitive it is in practice.

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  • Kwame Opam

    Sep 9, 2014

    Kwame Opam

    Apple said 'One more thing' for the first time since Steve Jobs' death

    For the first time since the death of Steve Jobs, Tim Cook took the stage and let himself say Jobs' signature line: "One more thing." The phrase was said moments before the new Apple Watch reveal — probably the biggest new device since Jobs' death — and clearly signals that the company is finally willing to let the Jobs legacy lie. Indeed, the company has been bolder and more daring this year, and their willingness to have more fun was present today. Here's to the new Apple.

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  • Sep 9, 2014

    Vlad Savov

    Apple Watch announced: available for $349 early next year

    We can finally lay months of rumors and speculation to rest. The iWatch is real and it's called the Apple Watch. Tim Cook describes it as the next chapter in Apple's history. It's a "comprehensive health and fitness device," says Cook, much as it was expected, but it's also "an extremely precise and customizable timepiece." It is the most personal device that Apple's ever created. The key innovation that Apple is touting is a breakthrough in input mechanics, using a Digital Crown on the Watch that can scroll, zoom, and navigate the user interface without obstructing the display.

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  • Nathan Ingraham

    Sep 9, 2014

    Nathan Ingraham

    Apple drops iPhone 5S price to $99, makes iPhone 5C its free option

    As is always the case when Apple launches new iPhones, the lower end of the company's product offerings is getting shuffled around. Rather than update the controversial iPhone 5C, Apple has decided to slot that in as a free offering (with 8GB of storage, down from the 16GB it launched with), while the iPhone 5S now occupies its place at the $99 price point (both with a two-year contract, of course). It's probably the most logical thing Apple could have done with its increasingly complicated iPhone lineup — the iPhone 5C is essentially 2012's iPhone 5, and Apple has traditionally put its two-year-old phones in the free price slot.

    Keeping the iPhone 5S around at the $99 price point serves a few smart purposes — it gives customers a premium-quality iPhone with a smaller screen, should the iPhone 6 be too large, and it also helps the proliferation of Touch ID-enabled devices. As for storage, Apple hasn't released details — but it does seem like it'll continue to offer a few different capacity options for the 5S. We'll find out more once Apple's website is back up.

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